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Social storytelling site helps kids create, publish storybooks #edtech



https://www.commonsense.org/education/website/storybird

It's easy to imagine using Storybird as a free-write station, to prompt various writing tasks, or as a platform for peer workshopping. With a bit of creativity, storytelling can also be linked to a variety of school subjects, including history, science, and even math...

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RE: An Academic Use for Social Media

Lets face it, kids don't write letters anymore. In my experience, most adults don't either. The last letter I wrote was a few years ago, when I mailed a USB flash drive to a friend (before the days of Google Drive's unlimited file storage for education). I only included the letter as a joke. The letter was written like a Civil War era love letter. Something along the lines of 
"My dearest friend, though the miles that separate us are great, I feel closest to you now as I write this letter..." (It sounds better when read with a southern Civil War General style accent.)
So when kids practice writing by creating formal letters, its easy to see how this does not make much of a personal connection with a lot of students. What is the purpose of writing something that only the teacher (or a very limited audience) will actually see?
Whether we want them to or not, many of our students have an active presence on social media. This creates an opportunity to create more enga…