Skip to main content

Final post of 2016



Hello Everyone,

Mr. B is taking some much needed time off this holiday season. I shall return this January along with the launch of my improved YouTube channel.

Thanks again for your continued support of Mr. B Ed Tech!


Did you know?

Coca-Cola Helped Shape the Image of Santa


In 1931 the company began placing Coca-Cola ads in popular magazines. Archie Lee, the D'Arcy Advertising Agency executive working with The Coca-Cola Company, wanted the campaign to show a wholesome Santa who was both realistic and symbolic. So Coca-Cola commissioned Michigan-born illustrator Haddon Sundblom to develop advertising images using Santa Claus — showing Santa himself, not a man dressed as Santa.

For inspiration, Sundblom turned to Clement Clark Moore's 1822 poem "A Visit From St. Nicholas" (commonly called "'Twas the Night Before Christmas"). Moore's description of St. Nick led to an image of a warm, friendly, pleasantly plump and human Santa. (And even though it's often said that Santa wears a red coat because red is the color of Coca-Cola, Santa appeared in a red coat before Sundblom painted him.)

...

From 1931 to 1964, Coca-Cola advertising showed Santa delivering toys (and playing with them!), pausing to read a letter and enjoy a Coke, visiting with the children who stayed up to greet him, and raiding the refrigerators at a number of homes. The original oil paintings Sundblom created were adapted for Coca-Cola advertising in magazines and on store displays, billboards, posters, calendars and plush dolls. Many of those items today are popular collectibles.

Sundblom created his final version of Santa Claus in 1964, but for several decades to follow, Coca-Cola advertising featured images of Santa based on Sundblom’s original works. These paintings are some of the most prized pieces in the art collection in the company’s archives department and have been on exhibit around the world, in famous locales including the Louvre in Paris, the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago, the Isetan Department Store in Tokyo, and the NK Department Store in Stockholm. Many of the original paintings can be seen on display at World of Coca-Cola in Atlanta, Ga.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Microsoft Office: 40 of the Best Add-ins for PowerPoint

Check out these Add-ins for PowerPointhttp://www.powerusersoftwares.com/#!40-of-the-best-addins-plugins-and-apps-for-Microsoft-PowerPoint-free-or-not/biauv/56b62cf80cf26832893d6eb2

Now with the updated link.
Add-ins, similar to Google's Apps for Education Add-ons, add more features to Microsoft Office products. These are usually developed by other parties rather than by Microsoft.

8 Google Sheets Add-ons Teachers Need!

Google sheets is a very powerful, although a bit basic when compared with the industry standard Microsoft Excel. Google Sheets Add-ons add some of the advanced features of other spreadsheet programs into Sheets. These add-ons have allowed me to completely move away from Excel for all data entry.

We ...selected for you the 8 most popular applications there. Using these add-ons will enable you to:
Create graphs and forms and write complex math in your sheetsCreate and modify a planning schedule for project management in a spreadsheet; easily scaffold, manage and assess students projects in Google Drive...see the article below for more
http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2017/07/8-google-sheets-add-ons-every-teacher.html


Re: Inside the School Where Every Student Gets Their Own Teacher

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2019-09-16-inside-the-school-where-every-student-gets-their-own-teacher

Olivia is currently enrolled part-time in one of the most unique high school models in the country. Where many schools struggle with ever-expanding student-teacher ratios, Futures Academy, a California network of private schools serving middle- and high schoolers, follows a distinctly personalized model: Every class in every subject has one teacher and only one student. The model takes an eyebrow-raising twist on one-to-one instruction, which in many education circles has come to refer to one computer for every student.

This sounds like a discussion I have had many times with other educators when talking about school models and how to improve schools. "What if every student had their own teacher?" It is an intriguing idea that, on the surface, sounds like the ideal learning environment. However, most times I have discussed this, the conversation usually ends up saying that sma…